OpenSSL

Intro to HSMs

Hardware Security Modules(HSMs) are basically dedicated cryptography devices, and are often one of the first links in the chain of trust in so much of what we do with technology today.  They allow you to offload sometimes computationally expensive, cryptographic functions like signing or encryption and are often required in industries whose regulations require tight control of private key material(e.g. banking, certificate authorities).  They also allow you to have reliable auditing capabilities and are designed to be extremely difficult to tamper with.  This article does not try to sway you one way or the other in terms of using an HSM, whether or not you need an HSM is usually determined by regulation or security requirements and not performance reasons. If you want are not interested how I arrived at the numbers, click here to see the results. Read Full Article

Have you ever wondered what would happen if you tried to connect to a website that was serving a certificate chain way longer than normal?  I know, me too.  Often times security research is about thinking outside the box, and this is just one of those times.  Plus we might learn a few things along the way.

I’m new here.  What is a certificate chain?

When you connect to a secure website, your browser uses a TLS certificate to verify the authenticity of the connection and to help set ensign tonyup the encryption of the connection.  The way that you know that the certificate is valid is either because you have seen it before and saved it as a remembered certificate(this is common in a self-signed certificate situation or with SSH), in most cases someone else that you trust “signs” the website’s certificate.  Allow me to use Star Trek The Next Generation characters(source) to illustrate how this works.  If you meet Ensign Tony at Ten Forward, the next time that you meet him you will know who he is based on what he looks or sounds like.  This is how self-signed certificates work.
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I’m very excited to announce the launch of AM I SHA-1 – the SHA-1 Checkinator. This is a site that I have been working on for a few months off and on. Ever since Google announced that they were going to sunset support for SHA-1 support in Chrome, I felt that it would be cool to have an easy site to check your SSL/TLS certs. It isn’t difficult to check your certificates yourself, but not everyone is able to analyze their own certificates and understand the context under which they need to act to upgrade their certificates before the end of 2016. The tool/site I made takes a URL and downloads and parses the certificates for a site, and then helps you determine what action if any is required on your certificates. I realize that there are several tools out there that check for this already, but most of these are bundled into more extensive tests and the tests often take a long time to run. My goal with this site, was to be lean and quick so I focused on just checking for the presence of SHA-1 signatures in chain and leaf certificates. Plus it was a great learning experience.
amisha1
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PKI vs. CA

First we need to get a few terms straight.  I have heard the terms public key infrastructure(PKI) and certificate authority(CA) sometimes used in conversation interchangeably.  The difference is that a CA by itself doesn’t perform all of the functions of a PKI.  PKIs contain CAs, but they also have other components like certificate revocation lists(CRLs), online certificate status protocol(OCSP) responders that allow clients a higher degree of certainty when assessing whether or not a certificate is valid, even things like policy, which allows you to specify what kinds of certificates or what attributes can be signed by CAs within the PKI.

What is AD CS?

Active Directory Certificate Services(AD CS) is made by Microsoft and it is what a lot of companies use for their PKI needs.  It works well, gives you nice ways to interact with it and runs on Windows Server.  You can request certificates through a (somewhat ugly) web interface, you can also request/issue certificates through a Microsoft Management Console(MMC),  you can request/issue certificates at the command-line with certutil/certreq.  AD CS even handles things like CRL publishing over FTP or SMB and running an OCSP responder, in concert with IIS.  Even though certificate revocation is utterly broken in the consumer world, many PKI uses in the enterprise, e.g. EAP-TLS, generally require revocation to be ‘working’.
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